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Home / Research / Young scientist projects / MemoKid 2.0 – Memory Consolidation for Intentionally and Incidentally Learned Information in Relation to Prior Knowledge: A Comparison between Children and Young Adults

MemoKid 2.0 – Memory Consolidation for Intentionally and Incidentally Learned Information in Relation to Prior Knowledge: A Comparison between Children and Young Adults

We investigate to what extent strategic vs. incidental learning may modulate the efficiency of memory consolidation of events over time. Moreover, we investigate how this process may differ in children in comparison to adults.

Events that are congruent or incongruent with prior knowledge may benefit memory in different ways. Our prior work (as part of the project memokid) showed an unexpected beneficial effect of incongruent information in long-term memory in children, compared to young adults, after adaptive repeated learning procedure.

However, it is yet to be examined the extent to which strategic vs. incidental learning may modulate the efficiency of memory consolidation of events over time and how the temporal dynamics of this process may differ in children in comparison to adults. Moreover, little is known to what extent the relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and long-term memory consolidation in children is modulated by the learning procedure (e.g., magnification or compensation of individual differences in memory performance by using strategy).

Project Heads

Iryna Schommartz, Prof. Dr. Yee Lee Shing

Selected Publications

Brod, G., & Shing, Y. L. (2019). A boon and a bane: Comparing the effects of prior knowledge on memory across the lifespan. Developmental Psychology, 55(6), 1326–1337. https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0000712

Schommartz, I., Lembcke, P. F., Schuetz, H., de Chamorro, N. W., Bauer, M., Kaindl, A. M., Buss, C., & Shing, Y. L. (2021). From learning to remembering: How memory consolidation differs in term and preterm born children from young adults. BioRxiv, 2021.08.24.457558. https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.08.24.457558

Shing, Y. L., Werkle-Bergner, M., Brehmer, Y., Müller, V., Li, S.-C., & Lindenberger, U. (2010). Episodic memory across the lifespan: The contributions of associative and strategic components. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 34(7), 1080–1091. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2009.11.002